For Posterity's Sake         

A Royal Canadian Navy Historical Project

Landing Craft Infantry - Large

LCI(L) 135

LCI(L) 135 on Juno Beach


LCI(L) 135, like most of the landing craft of the Canadian 262nd Flotilla, was damaged by submerged obstacles as it approached the beach. Robert Marsh, a gunner on one of LCI(L) 135's Oerlikon cannons, photographed his vessel high and dry on the shore west of Bernières-sur-Mer after it had to be beached to prevent it from sinking. The twin ramps that allowed close to 200 Canadians of the North Nova Scotia Highlanders to disembark quickly (centre left) are still down. After hasty repairs, 135 pushed off the beach when the tide came in later that day.

Source: Canadian War Museum

George Metcalf Archival Collection CWM 19990143-002

Courtesy of the Canadian War Museum


Laid down: 22 Dec 1942

Launched: 13 Jan 1943

Transferred to RCN: 29 Jan 1944

Paid off: 02 Sep 1944

Fate: Unknown


LCI(L)-135 was built in the USA and transferred to the RN on completion. She was transferred to the RCN on 29 Jan 1944. During the D-Day landing, LCI(L)-135 was damaged by submerged obstacles and had to be repaired on the Normandy beaches so she could leave with the tide and return to England. On 02 Sep 1944 she was paid off and returned to the RN, being returned to the USN on 14 Mar 1946.


Commanding Officers

Lt John Douglas Kell, RCNVR (was CO on 06 Jun 1944 for D-Day Landings)


     In memory of those who have crossed the bar    

They shall not be forgotten


Lancaster, Cullis Stanley Jardine







Taylor, Alex





Former Crew Members

Elliott, John - 1944


Krpan, Ivan (John) - 1944

Marsh, Robert, Gunner - 1944


Michelin, R.B., RCNR (FR), RCNVR 

Smith, James Douglas, Slt, RCNVR - 01 Feb 1944


Photos and Documents


RCN Memories

A Sailor's Tale: From Ansell to Infinity



Ship's company photo for LCI(L)-135