For Posterity's Sake         

A Royal Canadian Navy Historical Project

Photos and Documents from the Collection of

Eric Baird

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Eric Baird

 

HMCS Joliette K418, HMCS Orillia

Captured French Schooners

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

 

The following was submitted by Donald (Bud) Rose - "The two ships are moored at the South / West corner of St. John's harbour, across from what would become in 1940 - the Royal Canadian Navy Dock Yard. In 1941, the Nfld Dockyard underwent extensive and ongoing renovations to bring the yard up to war time requirements, and the first graving dock which was built of wood in 1882 and re-built with concrete in 1925 was again upgraded as required from 1941 to 1945. This area also became the RCN - N A D during WW II, and today is occupied by the Canadian Coast Guard. The large square building in the top right hand corner of the photo is the Nfld Hotel, completed and opened in 1926. This indicates that this photo was taken post 1926. The area in which the vessels are moored was renovated in 1940. To be more exact, we can look at the reason they were there. In 1883 the Nfld cod fishery was in serious decline. The main reason given was the extensive fishing on the Nfld grand banks by the French and the Norwegians - which were supported by the French. To counteract this, Nfld enacted the "Bait Protection Act" which prohibited foreign fishing vessels from obtaining any bait from Nfld. The bait was Capelin - Squid & Herring - usually only available inside Newfoundland's territorial waters. Any fishermen caught selling bait to foreigners were arrested and any foreign vessel caught inside territorial waters was seized. In 1922 world historical events had an impact. The French islands on St. Pierre & Miquelon are situated less than 20 miles from Nfld.'s southern shore. The Nfld bait protection act had a great impact on their economy, which changed in 1922. Two major events occurred in that year; the United States introduced prohibition and France repealed their 'Act' which prohibited the import of foreign liquors into French territory. The end result was St. Pierre & Miquelon becoming the main shipping point for "illegal" wines and spirts entering the U S. With this re-vitalization of their economy, they virtually abandon the fishery. In 1933 the U S repealed the prohibition act and the economy of St. Pierre & Miquelon collapsed. By 1934 they were back to fishing and illegally buying bait from Nfld fishermen, and those who were caught had their vessels sized [which were towed to St. John's] Based on our island's history, I would say that these are sized vessels and would put a time frame of; between 1934 and 1935 for the taking of this photo."

HMS Hotspur

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

HMS Banff Y43

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

HMS Indomitable

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Unknown sailing vessel

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Iceland as seen from HMCS Joliette K418

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

US Destroyer in the Foyle River, Ireland

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

RMS Queen Mary

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Whaler race at St. Georges, Bermuda

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Boat transfer between unknown ships

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Frankie Stark, S.P.O., on unknown ship - iced up

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Unknown ship

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Jimmy Buck and Harold in Heavy Shop

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Burt, Eric Baird, and Percy Cunningham in the Light Shop

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

Two unknown sailors

Courtesy of Roger Clarke

 

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